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Posts Tagged ‘Swedish Spiced Cookies’

Pepparkakor
Gingersnaps
Swedish Spiced Cut Out Cookies

These are our special Christmas tree and gift cookies. I use this recipe for our Gingerbread men, Gingerbread women and Gingerbread animals and shapes Cookies.

When our girls were young, we used to make these for on our Christmas tree and then in later years for a separate Gingerbread Christmas tree.

To hang on the tree, make a small hole in each before baking. A nail works well for making the hole. Make sure that you do not put the hole too close to the edge. After the cookies have cooled, use yarn or wide string for hanging.

This recipe makes 25 dozen small cookies or approximately 11 dozen large cookies.

The dough can be kept, covered, in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. So, you do not have to make all of these cookies at once.

Put in tins or plastic tubs (air tight) and store in a cool, dry place.

These are a historic Swedish Christmas Cookie.

Decorating:
Can be decorated with icing. We tend not to do that. We decorate with currants, or small pieces of cut-up raisins for eyes, ears, and buttons or silver balls. We do not usually sprinkle toppings on these, but you certainly could. I say ‘usually’ because depending on the age of my baking helpers, we do interesting ideas for decorating.

These are a crisp cookie. I have a great recipe for soft Gingerbread, but this is not a soft cookie.

Ingredients:
10 c. all-purpose flour (spoon tightly in to cups, but not packed down)
1 lb. butter, or margarine, softened
3 c. sugar
1 ½ c. water
2 T. Ground cloves (or to suit your taste)
2 T. Ground ginger (or to suit your taste)
2 T. Ground cinnamon (or to suit your taste)
1 T Ground cardamom (optional – I do not use)
Note: I use a lesser amount of cloves, about the same ginger, and more cinnamon.
1 T. Baking soda
2 T. dark corn syrup

Icing – see later note.

Directions:
Put flour in a mixing bowl.
Combine butter and sugar in a large mixing bowl.
In a small saucepan mix 1 ½ cups water and remaining ingredients (NOT icing), Bring to a boil and pour over butter and sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved.
Add flour about a cup at a time, blending well after each addition.

Store, well covered, overnight in the refrigerator. Dough will be quite soft, but will stiffen overnight.

Roll a small amount at a time, on lightly floured surface, to 1/8” thickness.
Hint: Pastry cloth and a stockinet rolling pin cover rubbed with flour and excess shaken off are a useful help; but not necessary. I use waxed paper and a lightly floured wooden rolling pin.

Cut with cookie cutter(s).
Hint: Use about the same size cookie cutters for each cookie sheet for even baking.

Decorate with currants (Note: Baking Currants are actually usually Zante raisins, a tiny very flavorful raisin) or cut bits of raisins for eyes, etc.

Bake on ungreased cookie sheets in moderate (375°) oven 6 minutes, or until well browned. Let cool on the cookie sheet.

Decorate with Icing (Optional)
Icing
Ingredients:
2 c. confectioner’s sugar
1 egg white
1 t. lemon juice
Hint: use fresh squeezed lemon juice without pulp.

Directions:
Blend ingredients.

Let cookies stand until icing is firm prior to putting the cookies in containers.

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Cranberry Drop Cookies

Ingredients:
½ c. butter or margarine
1 c. granulated sugar
¾ c packed brown sugar
¼ c. milk
2 T orange juice
1 egg
2 1/3 c. All-purpose flour
1 t. baking powder
1 t. baking soda
½ t. salt
1 c. chopped nuts (optional) Suggestions: Walnuts, Pecans, or Almonds.
2 1/2 c. coarsely chopped cranberries

Directions:
Cream butter and sugars together.
Beat in the milk, orange juice and egg.
Mix together the next four (dry) ingredients.
Add dry ingredients to the creamed mixture a cup or so at a time, and mix well.
Stir in nuts (if using) and cranberries.
Drop by teaspoonfuls on to greased baking sheet.
Bake in a moderate oven (375°) about 12 minutes, until lightly browned on bottom and edges.
Makes about 6 ½ dozen.

Other than the cut out cookies, these say Winter holidays to me. If I only made one cookie this would be it.

Very moist. Definitely store in one layer, or separated in layers by waxed paper or aluminum foil in plastic container or tin. They will stick together if not layered separately.

Colorful and a bit tart. These are great with a cup of coffee, tea or hot cocoa or a glass of milk.

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Baking Plan

Are you baking the cookies on your own?  Do you have young helpers? A group of Teenagers?  Little ones and Elderly? Girls and Boys? Women and Men? Physically or mentally challenged? You can adjust to have a fun time, building skills and joyful memories.

Here’s a baking plan for a good variety of memory making Cookies:                                                                   

If Rolled and Cut Out Cookies are an important part of your Cookie Baking Experience:

Depending on the ages of your cookie bakers, you can pre-mix doughs for the rolled and cut out cookies – for instance:  the Sour Cream Cut Out Cookies, the Cut Out Sugar Cookies, and the Gingersnaps, so that the dough will be ready for your bakers.

If starting all the cookies from the beginning with your bakers, have them start with the Drop Cookies, while others mix the dough that needs to chill.

Do Not believe that You have to make rolled and cut out cookies.  A good variety of Drop Cookies and Bar Cookies shows your love and teaches cookie making from scratch to the next generation.

Sour Cream Drop Cookies, Sugar Drop Cookies, Cranberry Drop Cookies, Molasses Drop Cookies, Raisin and Nut Drop Cookies, and a couple Bar Cookies like Jelly Bar Cookies, Seven Layer Bars, Rice Krispies Squares and Brownies make nice presentations and teach “from scratch” cookie baking skills.

If time is restricted – when is it not? the grocery store refrigerated rolls or packaged dry cookies being cooked and baked by you and your ‘bakers’ is easy and quick fun and quick success.

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It is Holiday Baking time, and we have had requests for some tried and true cookie recipes and helpful hints.

Stay tuned…there will be a flurry of recipes from our 45 years of marriage and ancestors’ recipe collections.

Photos as we bake some of the recipes, or from years past.

I remember “watching to learn” and “helping” my paternal grandmother, Dorothy Grace Wiederhold Oschman, in her small “Cape Cod” style cottage kitchen in Connecticut. Cooking and baking with her formed some of my earliest memories.

We would also visit my maternal grandmother, Margaret Dixon Moss, in Northeastern Pennsylvania, and she would come to visit us in Connecticut.  She was an excellent cook and baker too and taught my mother, her sisters and brother to cook some nourishing family recipes.

More memories along the way…

Here come several posts of cookie recipes and helpful hints.

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