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Archive for the ‘Antique Shop’ Category

I have been spending the last few years trying to sort through John’s, my and our girls’ stuff, our parents’ and ancestors’ things, and family items.

We are extremely fortunate to have many mementos that we have accumulated over the years, and items that go back many generations on all branches of the family tree. Some of the lessons that I’d like to pass along are the obvious ones, which bear repeating. Others you may not have thought about.

# 1 Label all your pictures, on the back, when you can! Don’t use pencil or ball point pens, if you can avoid it. Use thin point permanent markers. Test the ink on the edge of the back of the photo. There are photos that I have been shown over the years, and ones that turned up in boxes, and drawers. Many of the pictures are obvious who they are of…some are not at all. Memories vary in their accuracy also. Even photos that the subjects of seem obvious to one family member, are not so obvious to another. We’ve had good help from some extended family members in identifying subjects and places. But there are going to be “family” photos that we cannot identify at all. Don’t let it happen in your family!

# 2 Either make a list, or individually put notes, with special pieces of glassware, china, or tools. I followed John’s mother, Harriet, around the house one day, making notes on all sorts of pieces of glassware, furniture, etc. I had it listed by whom in the family it had belonged to, and what cabinet it was in or where it was in the house. But they moved. She moved twice. Some pieces I can match up. Some, I cannot.

When we do not know if a piece of pottery has been in the family for six generations, or if it was something that Harriet bought at a Yard Sale or Flea Market, we say: “It’s an Heirloom. It was my Grandmother’s”. John’s father’s mother used to put notes inside items. They would say a few lines about the history of the item. Often, the note would also say who she wanted to have the item when she was gone. This worked very well.

His aunt and uncle gave a lot of items to the people that they wanted to have them, while they were alive. That way they could tell them about the items, and see the people’s pleasure in receiving the gifts. Many items she would label. Elizabeth, our oldest daughter, and I tried to take pictures of items, and then label the picture. It does not always work. We still have a lot to identify. But we are making progress. If you have copies of these photos off the premises, it also helps if there is a fire, or theft.

#3 The greatest gift that you can give to your family is their past. Do not be embarrassed about how you look in a video; do not be afraid of how your spelling or sentences read. Have your family run a video camera at Christmas. Tell them about the quilt that Great Aunt Annie made at her church group. Show them the piece of hand blown glass that their Uncle Donald blew, and how he could make scientific hand-blown glass. Identify the plane that Grandpop used to hone the kitchen cabinets in the house he built. If the family isn’t home for the holidays, take pictures of your bowl for baking bread; the rolling pin that was your great great grandmother’s; the china cabinet that was rescued from your parents’ house fire. Don’t just say “Great Great Grandmother’s”. Say the name. And say if you mean your Great Great Grand, or your son’s, or your grand-daughter’s. It makes a difference!

Make copies of the photos that you take of the items. Label them. Send them. Don’t worry that they are not in a fancy scrapbook. Don’t wonder if anyone will care. Do it. Give your descendents your memories.

My grandfather used to say: “It’s all memories”. Don’t wait to share those precious memories and remembrances.

With all the flooding, fires, earthquake producing rubble, and other disasters occurring daily, this all seems naïve and rustic.  And many people won’t care about their past.  But, at some point most people would say that they wish that they had more memories from their elders.

John’s health has limited his mobility the past few years, and has restricted mine.  You would think that would have helped with downsizing, but it is not so.

We are on a motivated path to try to catch up with the memories and reduce the “stuff” before someone else has to try to figure it all out.  Britta has also gotten her household items out of storage, and is working on unpacking and editing her things.

Watch for downsizing notes and offers of items for sale…in SouthEast Tennessee and Northwest Washington State. Donations will be leaving the houses and memories will be added to the blogs.

Join us on the journeys and make sure that you work on saving the memories before its too late.

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The Shop and the Greenhouse are Permanently Closed.

We are working on downsizing…a wide variety of items. I’ll be posting ways to find us on eBay, Etsy, Letgo, and Various Facebook local area Yard Sale sites.

I do post on the Facebook page at “Antiques at Morgan Lane” and “Morgan Lane Enterprises – the Shops at Morgan Lane”.  Also, general postings on the page for “Organic Greenhouse at Morgan Lane”.

The “Sleipnir Morgan Horse Farm” Facebook page and my Facebook page “Georgia Denman” are also active and ways to find us.  We still have many Morgan Horses, several trained and/or started, to finish yourself or by your trainer.

Visit us online…

But, please remember that the Shops are Permanently Closed.

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Scotch Shortbread

Always use real butter for this recipe!

Ingredients:
1 c. sweet (unsalted) butter
½ c. confectioner’s sugar
2 c. sifted All-purpose flour

Directions:
Cream butter and beat in sugar gradually.

Mix in flour well.

Turn dough out on a baking sheet and pat in to a circle (round) about ¾” thick and 7” in diameter.

Pinch the edge of the shortbread all the way around and prick all over with a fork.

Chill in the refrigerator for at least a ½ hour.

Bake in a moderate oven (375°) for 5 minutes.
Then reduce the heat to 300° and bake about 45 minutes.

The shortbread should be gold, not brown, when done.
While still warm, cut in wedges. Small wedges. This is very rich!

Yields 16 small wedges.

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Sour Cream Drop Cookies

Ingredients:
¼ c soft butter
1 c sugar
1 egg
2 c sifted all purpose flour
½ t salt
½ t baking soda
1 c dairy sour cream – I use Light, or sometimes Fat Free
Colored sugars, cinnamon sugar, or sprinkles for topping

Directions:
Cream Butter and sugar until light.
Beat in egg.
Add in sifted dry ingredients alternately with sour cream and beat until smooth.
Drop by rounded teaspoonfuls on to greased cookie sheets.
Sprinkle with toppings. Almost any type of sprinkles and colored sugars can be used…easy and fun for whatever age the “bakers” are.
Try not to get too many toppings on the cookie sheet to avoid burnt sugar for harder cleanup.

Bake in moderate oven (350°) about 15 minutes.
Makes approximately 5 dozen 2” cookies.
Don’t be put off by the “sour cream”. The cookies do not taste “sour”. It makes them light and puffy. 

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Butter: If the recipe calls for butter, and it does not say “sweet” or “unsalted” you can use either salted or unsalted butter. If the recipe also calls for salt, be aware and don’t over salt your cookies.

I will usually note if it can be butter or margarine, but use your own judgment, taste, and budget. Also, brand name v. store brand.

Also some recipes call for Crisco – it can be either scooped from a can or cut from a Crisco stick. To measure Crisco from the can, use a larger than called for glass or plastic measuring cup. Fill a portion with water, and then scoop the Crisco in to the measuring cup, until the level of the water reaches the amount of the water + Crisco. Then, pour off the water, and go ahead with the Crisco in the recipe.

Now, Crisco comes in baking sticks, in either unflavored or “butter” flavored.

The use of butter, margarine, and Crisco, can or stick, all might make a difference in the texture of the cookies. Unless one is specifically referenced, they can be alternated to try on your own. Look on the box, tub, etc to see if the ingredient can be used for baking. Some types are not recommended for baking.

And, of course, there is “organic”.

Use the best ingredients that you can, but be aware that sometimes it does matter, and sometimes it doesn’t.

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Bluegrass Magazine Blue cover
Volume 10, # 6,
December 1975

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Tennessee is home to many fans of Bluegrass Music. The Antique Shop is currently closed; but we have some personal items that we will be offering for sale. I will attempt to upload photos of the covers…possibly as separate postings.
You can reach me at: 423 284 0899 Cellular and Texts.

Bluegrass Unlimited Magazines; dedicated to the furtherance of bluegrass music
July 1975 December 1975 December 1976
Lots of bluegrass music history. Many names and places. Full of photos. These issues are 36 & 37 years old.

Vol. 10, No. 1 July 1975
Brown cover; some shaved areas…
Mac Wiseman is featured on the cover.
Contents: General Store; Letters; Mac Wiseman by Don Rhodes; Lawrence Lane & The Kentucky Grass by James Wagoner; Clyde Moody: Old Time, Bluegrass, and Country Musician by Ivan M. Tribe and John W. Morris; Record Reviews; Book Reviews; Eddie and The Mueller Brothers by M.E. Vogel & N.E. Mondrik; Personal Appearance Calendar; Now Appearing; Classified Ads.
Buy It Now Price: $20.00

Vol. 10, No. 6 December 1975
Blue cover, subscription label
Bill Keith is featured on the cover.
Contents: Slim Martin: In Memoriam by Ivan M. Tribe; Letters; General Store; Early bird Bluegrass Concert Best of the D J Convention by Bonnie Smith; Bill Keith by Tony Trischka; Record Reviews; Paul Mullins: Musician, Disc Jockey, and Bluegrass Influence by Frank and Marty Godbey; Tasty Licks: Nice New Sounds in Boston by Don Kahn; Personal Appearance Calendar; Now Appearing; Classified Ads.
Buy It Now Price: $20.00

Vol. 11, No. 6 December 1976
Red label; some label residue
The Shenandoah Cutups are featured on the cover
Contents: General Store; Letters; The Shenandoah Cutups: Classic Bluegrass from a newer group by Ivan M. Tribe; Leslie Keith: Black Mountain Odyssey by Bob Sayers; Expanding the Horizons: Susie Monck and Tony Trischka by Mike Greenstein; Robert Dickey: Dulcimer Craftsman by Margaret King; Record Reviews; Book Reviews; The Road Trip by Charles Brumley; J.B. Prince-Impossible to Duplicate by Charles Mathis; Personal Appearance Calendar; Now Appearing; Classified Ads.
Buy It Now Price: $20.00

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